Services

Recycling

Glass is infinitely recyclable and in doing so we save raw materials, lessen energy demand, cut CO2 emissions and reduce the amount of materials going landfill.

We represent and promote glass recycling for the benefit of all members at local, national and European government level and work proactively with government agencies, regulators and other stakeholders to achieve these goals.

Working with organisations such as WRAP and Zero Waste Scotland, we help to shape recycling policy and ensure that good intentions lead to good results. For example, we have worked with the  Recycle Now campaign to develop resources that help local authorities communicate the benefits of recycling and get householders thinking beyond the kitchen to see the recyclables all around their home.

We keep our members informed of changes to legislation, share best practice case-studies and provide a source of information on all matters relating to the waste and recycling industry.

As a partner in the €9 million FISSAC zero-waste project, we’re working with companies in construction, demolition, recycling, and glass manufacture - here in the UK and across Europe – to develop innovative industrial best practice for large-scale recycling of building glass that are commercially viable.

Through British Glass we represent and promote the recycling industry for the benefit of all members of the association and are the principal voice for the glass recycling industry - minimising resource use, diverting glass containers from landfill and developing ‘best practice’.

New solutions to develop and promote both recycling and sustainability are required across the industry and we see the answer to lay in developing relationships, building dialogue and engaging across all parts of the supply chain. The involvement of all stakeholders - from raw materials, manufacturers and processors to brand owners, designers, retailers, local authorities and waste management companies - will be crucial in helping the government establish suitable policies and for all of the supply chain to achieve challenging sustainability and recycling targets.

Related Publications


GLASS - Pure and Sustainable Packaging

GLASS - Pure and Sustainable Packaging

This information sheet outlines the benefits and key features of glass packaging that make it both a pure and sustainable packaging medium.

Download PDF (0.48 MB)


Recycled Content Fact Sheet

Recycled Content Fact Sheet

This British Glass fact sheet provides information on the typical recycled content of glass packaging placed onto the marketplace, aggregated at UK level.

Download PDF (0.24 MB)


  • British Glass represents the interests of primary glass manufacturers and the glass supply-chain, from raw materials to retail and the end-consumer" credits="n/a" >
  • Modern life would not be possible without glass
    But, what is this amazing substance, where does it come from and how is it made?" credits="n/a" >
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  • British Glass represents the interests of primary glass manufacturers and the glass supply-chain, from raw materials to retail and the end-consumer" credits="n/a" >
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Many glass making terms have entered the language: 'Coddswallop': Hiram Codd invented the marble stoppered 'pop' bottle in the 1870s, and millions of the bottles were made, particularly in South Yorkshire. 'Wallop' was the name given to the cheap beer of the day, and beer drinkers dubbed the contents of the codd bottle 'a load of coddswallop'.


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